The Karen Pryor Academy Experience

Kat Camplin, a resident of Los Angeles recently graduated with distinction from Karen Pryor Academy and has been named a Certified Training Partner. Kat Camplin is committed to force-free training techniques that make a difference in the lives of pets and their owners.
Kat Camplin, a resident of Los Angeles recently graduated with distinction from Karen Pryor Academy.

After getting laid off from my job in August 2012, I was presented with the, “What do I want to be when I grow up?” question. I’d spent 20 years in Corporate America and this was the second layoff in 4 years. It was an uncomfortable position to be in – to be at the mercy of an economy and business I didn’t control. I love training dogs, have put Rally and Obedience titles on some, but you can’t major in Dog Training at your local community college. It doesn’t exist. So I decided to use my severance money to enroll in the Karen Pryor Academy and make the commitment to travel to San Diego every 6 weeks for 6 months.
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Dog Training Rituals

[schema type=”blog” title=”Dog Training Rituals” Written by “Kat Camplin, KPA-CTP” url=”http://rompingdogs.com/training/dog-training-rituals/” dateCreated= March 4, 2013 description=”Rituals include a series of cues that can mean “It’s time to train!” or “We’re done training!” and are useful for letting your dog know what’s coming next.” city=”Arcadia” state=”Ca” postalcode=”91007″ country=”US” email=”rompingdogs@gmail.com” phone=”(626) 386-3077″]

Using rituals during dog training can be very helpful. Rituals include a series of cues that can mean “It’s time to train!” or “We’re done training!” and are useful for letting your dog know what’s coming next. For competition, rituals are great for entering and exiting the ring. They can also allow your dog to communicate with you. When your dog breaks a ritual there is usually a problem.

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Help with Mouthy Dogs

[schema type=”blog” title=”Help with Mouthy Dogs” Written by “Kat Camplin, KPA-CTP” url=”http://rompingdogs.com/training/help-with-mouthy-dogs/” dateCreated= March 1, 2013 description=” Bouncing your hand around on the floor so your puppy “attacks” it is quite cute at 8 weeks of age, but becomes a scary problem when your adolescent or adult dog is suddenly 50 pounds and jumping to play with your hand.” city=”Arcadia” state=”Ca” postalcode=”91007″ country=”US” email=”rompingdogs@gmail.com” phone=”(626) 386-3077″]

What is a mouthy dog?

“Mouthy” in dogs generally means “puts teeth on skin without drawing blood,” although scratches and minor wounds may occur when the dog is really excited. Mouthiness is corrected by the mother when the puppy is very young, but can be relearned by humans using their hands as toys. Bouncing your hand around on the floor so your puppy “attacks” it is quite cute at 8 weeks of age, but becomes a scary problem when your adolescent or adult dog is suddenly 50 pounds and jumping to play with your hand. Doing too much with teeth can make giving treats during training difficult. If your dog nips to the point you can’t treat to train you really need to fix the nipping first.
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CGC, Therapy Dogs, Service Dogs and Assistance Dogs – What’s the difference?

[schema type=”blog” title=”CGC, Therapy Dogs, Service Dogs and Assistance Dogs – What’s the difference? ” Written by “Kat Camplin, KPA-CTP” url=”http://rompingdogs.com/articles/therapy-dogs-service-dogs-and-assistance-dogs-whats-the-difference/” dateCreated= February 24, 2013 description=”The AKC Canine Good Citizen test was created to promote responsible dog ownership by encouraging dog owners to train their dog to have good doggy manners in public. ” city=”Arcadia” state=”Ca” postalcode=”91007″ country=”US” email=”rompingdogs@gmail.com” phone=”(626) 386-3077″]

As an AKC CGC Evaluator, I get a lot of emails asking about testing dogs as a first pass to a Therapy Dog certification, when they really mean Service Dog. I thought I’d take the opportunity to note the differences.
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When the dog trainer needs a dog trainer.

I’ve been really busy working on my KPA certification and have been training all 3 dogs quite a bit. I played with treat values (hot dogs rule!) and training 3 very different dogs the same behaviors using the same methods. It’s been fun, but it appears I over-stimulated Paisley.
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The positive and the negative

Most dog trainers know the difference between a positive reinforcement (“Good dog!” or giving a treat,) and a punishment (a collar pop or “No”,) but it’s not up to the trainer to tell the dog what is good and what is bad. The dog decides what it likes and what it doesn’t like.
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Training Dogs to Wash Their Feet

With the week of rain we had last week, my yard is a complete muddy mess. After spending hours vacuuming little mud pebbles a few times a day, I’d hit my limit. It was time for the dogs to deal with their own mud.

I got a low mixing tub from the local home center and stuck in on the porch.
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Teaching “Let me help.”

[schema type=”blog” title=”Teaching Dogs “Let me help.”” Written by “Kat Camplin, KPA-CTP” url=”http://rompingdogs.com/training/teaching-let-me-help” dateCreated= November 23, 2012 description=””Let me help” lets the dog learns that you can fix things. After awhile the dog will come to you or freeze and look at you if there is a problem.” city=”Arcadia” state=”Ca” postalcode=”91007″ country=”US” email=”rompingdogs@gmail.com” phone=”(626) 386-3077″]

My dogs, like myself, seem to be klutzes. This morning while Rox was rolling around on the floor she somehow got a piece of thread wrapped around one of her teeth, a maneuver I’m still trying to figure out. As she’s semi-freaking out and pawing at her mouth I say “let me help” coupled with the hand signal for “come”, she stopped pawing, and walked over to me allowing me to remove the thread.
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Global Doggy Rules

This weekend at the KPA Dog Trainer Program Workshop, we discussed ways to train dogs to wait at a boundary (in this case a doorway) until released to go through. When asked how I train boundaries I said, “A wait, is a wait, is a wait.” “Wait” does not have any context or environment or dog position rules. A “wait” means, “You stay put until I say it’s ok to move.” It doesn’t matter if it’s in a car, crate, hiking trail, kitchen, bedroom or sitting with a hot dog 6 inches away. A “wait” is a “wait.” It’s a Global Rule.
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The universal usability of “Get It”

I was reminded today how useful “Get It” is as a command when my handy dryer ball bounced off the wall and under the bed as I was doing laundry. Yes, I could have gone to get a flashlight, discovered the batteries were almost dead, find the batteries, replace the batteries, then go back to the bedroom and crawl around on the floor to find the dryer ball. Instead I just pointed under the bed and said “Get It” and two of my dogs went into competition to “Get It” first. That’s so much easier!
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